William F. Massy

Recent Posts

Out of Crisis, Strategy!

Posted by William F. Massy on Sep 13, 2021 11:10:22 AM

world on a chessboard isolated on blue sky background. Elements of this image furnished by NASA

Campuses are coming back to life, but that doesn’t mean a return to business as usual. Virus containment remains critical, but so is the need to address the pandemic’s huge legacy of disruption. The financial health of many schools is severely challenged, and neither teaching and learning nor the character of student demand will ever be the same. Campus leaders feel an urgent need to close current budget gaps and develop strategies for the future.

Topics: program planning, Academic Strategy


Predictive Models for Academic Resourcing

Posted by William F. Massy on Jun 1, 2021 5:08:47 PM

Computers room at the university or college library

 

University leaders are seriously planning for the post-COVID world.  This world will differ significantly from the old, familiar one.  The possibilities for restructuring academic activities are increasing dramatically as graduate employment patterns shift and faculty and students accept new modes of digitally mediated instruction.  Bob Atkins’ recent blog, “Higher Education:  Are You Ready for the Economic Boom?“ speaks to the opportunities available to institutions that are prepared to launch “different types of programs.”

Topics: Predictive Analytics


Envisioning Alternative Course and Program Portfolios

Posted by William F. Massy on Apr 6, 2021 3:43:44 PM

Future on Pocket Watch Face with Close View of Watch Mechanism. Time Concept. Vintage Effect.The importance of envisioning future course and program portfolios will be familiar to readers of my recent blogs.  Provosts, deans, and others responsible for academic resourcing invest time and money to get better data on their portfolios:  e.g., by using Gray Associates’ Program Economics Platform (PEP).  These data help them identify strategies for improvement, which is especially important given the current Covid-19 disruptions.  We are pleased to introduce PEP+, our new predictive model for envisioning the consequences of changing a school’s lineup of courses and programs, just in time to help mitigate these disruptions. 

Topics: Higher Education, Curricular Efficiency, Predictive Analytics, Academic Program Economics


What is the University's Purpose?

Posted by William F. Massy on Jan 18, 2021 8:30:00 AM

Close up of a bookshelf in library

 

The recent Chronicle of Higher Education/Deloitte report, “The College Business Model in a Crisis,” rekindled my concerns about the ultimate purposes of our enterprise and how these purposes can more effectively guide planning and operational decision-making.  The questions are no longer hypothetical, if indeed they ever were. Will problem-solving triggered by the hyper-disruptive COVID-19 event reaffirm core academic values or will it spawn new business models that, over time, will undermine them?

Topics: Higher Education, 2021, Innovation, Mission, purpose


Escaping the Academic Equality Quagmire

Posted by William F. Massy on Nov 24, 2020 11:01:48 AM

Escaping the Program Equality Quagmire

Stuck in the mud

Academic programs, and the courses that deliver their content, are not of equal importance.  The implications of this came home to me recently when, in a webinar on academic resourcing, a participant objected that provosts and deans should not “put their thumbs on the scale” by considering program importance when deciding admission targets and departmental budgets.  “All programs and courses are of equal importance,” the participant asserted. “Providing their quality is good, all should have equal access to funding.”

Topics: Programs, College Courses, Program Economics, Curricular Efficiency


Revolution in AR

Posted by William F. Massy on Sep 22, 2020 1:17:53 PM

It’s Time for a Revolution in Academic Resourcing

The Best of Times...The Worst of Times — Carol McLeod Ministries | Find Joy  in Your Everyday Life

 

This new academic year is unlike any other.  Colleges and universities are coping with nasty deficits and cash flow problems, but the probable long-term disruptions are even more worrisome.  Never in my half-century of close involvement with academic resourcing have I seen such threats to the operating and financial sustainability of so many institutions.  As Charles Dickens said, it is the worst of times.

Topics: Programs, Academic Programs, Program Economics, Curricular Efficiency, Academic Resourcing


How to Boost Student Engagement—Even Online

Posted by William F. Massy on Jul 29, 2020 12:56:47 PM

 

 
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The recent New York Times op-ed about how to make online courses more engaging got me thinking about course redesign generally, especially as it applies in the current COVID-driven environment. Readers may recall my blogs on pruning unneeded courses and rebalancing program portfolios. When done well, these actions can allow the institution to cut costs and boost revenues while minimizing the adverse impacts on student learning and faculty workloads. As noted in the “rebalancing” blog, they fall into the set of four such actions shown at the right. Course redesign is element 3 of this action set.

Topics: Program Economics, Curricular Efficiency, Online Courses


Money Problems? Look to Your Academic Portfolios.

Posted by William F. Massy on Jun 17, 2020 12:53:20 PM

 

 

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What college or university doesn’t have money problems these days?  We’ve seen such problems before but this time they’re deeper and more acute.  In the “good old days,” such as the stagflation of the 1970s and the economic recessions of the 80s, 90s, and 2008, the solutions involved a grab-bag of common-sense actions based on relatively crude information. These include:  cutting fixed percentages of cost from administrative and support services, pressing upwards on class sizes and teaching loads, substituting adjunct for regular faculty wherever possible, and hacking away at small classes.  In today’s environment, however, the sufficiency of these actions seems doubtful because of the depth of the money problems and because the low-hanging fruit already has been depleted by years of belt-tightening.

Topics: Program Margin, Academic Programs, Curricular Efficiency, Programs Economics


How to Dislodge Course and Program Proliferation

Posted by William F. Massy on May 5, 2020 11:10:34 AM

Dislodging Events A Potential Curb on Course and Program Proliferation

Steve Probst’s recent blog on curricular efficiency reminded me how serious the course and Dense forestprogram proliferation problem has become for America’s colleges and universities. For example, my forthcoming book reports that:

“Many programs persist beyond what should have been their sell-by dates. In one dataset reported by Bob Zemsky, for example, a daunting 48 percent of programs turned out ten or fewer graduates per year and collectively accounted for only 7 percent of all degrees granted . Bob puts the matter succinctly: “We [colleges] give students what they want. Most colleges can’t afford to do so without understanding why they can’t.” This doesn’t mean all low-enrollment programs should go on trial, but campuses do need serious and well-informed conversations on the matter” (p. 6).

Topics: Curricular Efficiency, Programs Economics, Course Costs


We Are All Coronavirus Fighters Now

Posted by William F. Massy on Mar 24, 2020 10:48:09 AM

That “we are all coronavirus fighters now” hit me with a vengeance when I cut short my Mexican vacation and settled into a regimen of hand-washing and social distancing. This applies no less to colleges and universities in the United States and across the world. Schools are canceling face-to-face classes, and many are sending students home or telling them not to return fromAbstract molecules medical blue background spring break. I wondered how academic resourcing (AR) models—the subject on which I’ve worked during the past decade—will impact institutional efforts to combat the coronavirus and deal with its consequences. To put the matter bluntly, will the momentum toward data-informed decision-making that has been building over the last few years be blunted by the coronavirus emergency? I believe this outcome would be a real setback for higher education—and also that it is not supported, let alone dictated, by the facts of the situation.

Topics: Program Economics, Coronavirus, Modeling